Egyptian Eyes (aka “One-eyed Pirates”)

Photo: Egyptian eyes recipe. Credit: Lisa Borre.
David has “Egyptian eyes” — a favorite breakfast recipe — in the cockpit of Gyatso during our Atlantic crossing in 2007.

During our passage from Antigua to Bermuda, we included this recipe as part of our daily logs posted to the ARC Europe website: Lisa cooked up a breakfast favorite known to us as “Egyptian Eyes” (also known as “One Eyed Pirates” at the Wet Dog Cafe or “Sunshine Susies” at the Main Ingredient, both local restaurants back at our homeport in Annapolis,
Maryland).

These are made by cutting a hole in a piece of bread (we have found that the souvenir rum glasses from Guadeloupe work quite well for this but any round glass or cookie cutter will do), placing this on a hot, buttered griddle, and cracking an egg in the center of the hole in the bread. Once the egg is firm on the bottom but not cooked through, flip the bread and cook for 1-2 more minutes depending on how you like your eggs done. We usually like our eggs cooked medium, but we tend to cook them a bit less so that you can dip the bread in some of the runny yoke.

2 SERVINGS:
4 slices of bread
4 eggs
butter
salt and pepper, to taste

Etruscan Eyes (Tuscan Variation)

While staying at a villa in Tuscany with Lisa’s family,her sister Suze made a variation of this family favorite with local ingredients for their mother’s birthday breakfast. They were quickly declared “delizioso” and became known as “Etruscan Eyes.” Cooking the bread and eggs in olive oil makes this version taste like crostini and fried eggs. The mascarpone and arugala put this recipe over-the-top. Suze advised, “I probably used a bit more oil (compared to butter in the other recipe) and a bit hotter pan (than you might for Egyptian eyes). I was definitely trying to fry the bread like crostini. This got the bread crispy fast and kept the yolk runny.”

Day-old Italian bread
Farm-fresh eggs
High-quality, extra virgin olive oil
Mascarpone cheese
Fresh arugala
salt and pepper, to taste

Prepare and cook the bread and eggs as described above, exchanging the ingredients for locally available ones.  A small, sturdy wine glass works well for cutting the holes in the bread. Top with a dollop of cheese and several leaves of arugula.

 

Adventures while cruising to the Caribbean, Mediterranean, and Black Seas in a Tayana 37 sailboat

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